University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Faculty

Uw Carbone Cancer Center Director

Howard H. Bailey, MD, was appointed Director of the UW Carbone Cancer Center in 2014. He is a Professor of Medicine and Obstetrics & Gynecology whose clinical focus is gynecologic cancers and soft tissue tumors and whose research focus is predominantly in cancer chemoprevention with some continued work in Phase 1 and 2 Therapeutic Drug Development trials in gynecologic oncology and sarcomas. In addition to his clinical and research roles he continues to have various administrative roles as well including leading multiple clinical research networks for the Cancer Center and School of Medicine and Public Health; providing campus-wide Human Subjects Protection oversight; leading the Cancer Center's Clinical Cancer Research Training Award (K12) and Chemoprevention Program.

Research Interests: cancer chemoprevention, sarcoma, gynecologic malignancies

E-mail: hhb@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Bailey H, Agger W, Baumgardner D, Burmester J, Cisler R, Evertsen J, Glurich I, Hartman D, Yale S,DeMets D. The Wisconsin Network for Health Research (WiNHR): A Statewide, Collaborative, Multi-disciplinary, Research Group. Wisconsin Medical Journal 108 (9): 453-8, 2009. PMCID # 2852145
  2. Bailey H, Kim K, Verma A, Sielaff K, Larson P, Snow S, Lenaghan T, Viner J, Douglas J, Dreckschmidt N, Hamielec M, PomplunM, Sharata H, Puchalsky D, Berg E, Havighurst T, Carbone P. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 skin cancer prevention study of DFMO in subjects with previous history of skin cancer. Cancer Prevention Research, 3(1):35-47, 2010. PMCID # 2804946
  3. Traynor AM, Thomas JP, Ramanathan RK, Mody TD, Alberti D, Wilding G, and Bailey H. Phase I trial of motexafin gadolinium and doxorubicin in the treatment of advanced malignancies. Invest New Drugs 2009 PMID:1999.

Head, UW Division of Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care

Dr. O’Regan serves as Division Head, Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care, and Associate Director of Faculty Development and Education, UW Carbone Cancer Center. She is an internationally recognized breast cancer physician and researcher. Dr. O’Regan was previously a professor of hematology and medical oncology at Emory University, where she held the Louisa and Rand Glenn Family Chair in Breast Cancer Research and was the medical director at Glenn Family Breast Center of Emory University, director of the Breast Cancer Translational Research Program at the Winship Cancer Institute and chief of hematology and medical oncology at the Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady Memorial Hospital. With a highly active research program focused on identifying mechanisms of resistance to breast-cancer therapies and development of new therapies, Dr. O’Regan has been principal investigator for numerous grants and clinical trials. Her current research is focused on the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat resistant breast cancers, including triple negative breast cancer. Dr. O’Regan has received multiple awards and is ranked by Newsweek/Castle Connolly Medical as one of the top oncologists in the nation.

E-mail: roregan@medicine.wisc.edu

Fellowship Directors

Program Director

Dr. Lubner is an Assistant professor of Medicine and the Program Director of the UW Hematology/Oncology Fellowship program. He graduated from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, with a BA in History in 1999, and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, WI with a MD, in 2003. His postgraduate internship and residency training in Internal Medicine was performed at Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, in Saint Louis, MO from 2003 to 2006. He completed his fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, WI.

Dr. Lubner is very interested in teaching and has received several honors including the Resident Teacher of the Year Award in 2006 while at Washington University School of Medicine. In addition he received the Housestaff Leadership Award and the Housestaff Recruiting Leadership award in 2006. In addition he has held several teaching appointments throughout his career beginning in 200 with a Professor's Assistant Appointment in the Department of Anatomy at the University of Wisconsin. He was also the Chief Medical Resident, Karl-Flance Firm, Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University in 2007. Finally from 2007 to 2008 he was a clinical instructor in the Department of Medicine, in the Hospitalist Division at the Washington University School of Medicine.

In his position as Assistant Professor, he focuses on clinical and translational research in GI malignancies and is be active in the phase I drug development program. He will also be active in the educational mission of the section and cancer center through fellow, house staff and medical student education. As part of these groups he will attend the established multidisciplinary clinics and participate in their active clinical trials.

E-mail: sjlubner@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected publications:

  1. The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics, 32nd ed. Cooper DC. Krainik A. Lubner S. Reno H.eds. Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA. 2007.
  2. The Washington Manual Internship Survival Guide, 3rd ed. Faller B. Gada G. Lubner S. eds. Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA. 2008.
  3. Lubner S. Mahoney M. Kolesar J. LoConte N. Kim G. Pitot H. Philip PA. Picus J. Yong WP. Horvath L. VanHazel G. Erlichman C. Holen KD. "Report of a multicenter phase 2 trial testing a combination of biweekly bevacizumab and daily erlotinib in patients with unresectable biliary cancer (BC): A Phase 2 Consortium (P2C) study." Journal of Clinical Oncology. 28(21): 3491-97, 2010 Jul.
  4. Lubner S. LoConte N. Holen KD. Schelman W. Thomas JP. Jumonville A. Eickhoff J. Seo, S. Mulkerin D. " A phase II study of oxaliplatin, 5-FU, leucovorin and 2 days of high-dose oral capecitabine in atients with metastatic colorectal cancer." Clinical Colorectal Cancer. 9(3): 157-161, 2010 Jul.
  5. Lubner S. Kunnimalaiyaan M. Holen KD. Ning L. Ndiaye M. Loconte N. Mulkerin D. Schelman W. Chen H. "A preclinical and clinical study of lithium in low-grade neuroendocrine tumors" Accepted for publication The Oncologist 2010

Associate Program Director

Aric Hall, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine (CHS) and an Associate Director of the Hematology/Oncology Fellowship at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health and at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital. His focus is on the Hematology curriculum.

Associate Program Director

Ryan Mattison, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine (CHS) and an Associate Director of the Hematology/Oncology Fellowship at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health and at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital. Dr. Mattison received his medical degree at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. He then completed his internal medicine residency at the University of North Carolina Hospitals where he served as chief resident. Dr. Mattison completed his fellowship in hematology and medical oncology at the University of Chicago in 2009.

Dr. Mattison's clinical interests are in the care of patients with hematologic malignancies, particularly acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. He is interested in stem cell transplantation and drug development to improve the care and outcomes for these patients. Dr. Mattison is a member of the American Society of Hematology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. He is also active with the Wisconsin Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Dr. Mattison finds time to relax with his wife and three young children by exploring Wisconsin's state parks and by cycling through the hills of rural Dane County.

E-mail:rjmattison@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. R Mattison, S Larson, and W Stock. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia In Adults. In: Management of Hematologic Malignancies.S O'Brien, JM Vose, and HM Kantarjian, editors. (43-67). Cambridge, England. Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  2. Mattison RJ and RA Larson. Role of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adults With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Current Opinion in Oncology. 2009; 21(6):601-8
  3. Mattison RJ and W Stock. Approaches to Treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults. Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports. 2008; 3: 144-151
  4. RJ Mattison, K Ostler, F Locke, L Godley. Implications of FLT3 Mutations in the Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Reviews On Recent Clinical Trials 2007; 2:135-141.

UW Carbone Cancer Center Faculty

(Alphabetical Order)

 

Mark Albertini, MD, is an Associate Professor Medicine and a nationally-known melanoma researcher who has led treatment efforts for patients with metastatic melanoma since he joined our faculty in 1993. He is interested in the broad topic of host immunity against cancer and in understanding ways in which those host immune responses can be enhanced. The primary disease focus of his research involves human malignant melanoma. Dr. Albertini established the Comprehensive Melanoma Clinic in September of 1994 and is the leader of the UWCCC Melanoma Disease-Oriented working group. Dr. Albertini has been awarded the Professionalism Award by the UW Department of Medicine Housestaff and has been selected for listing by the Best Doctors in America organization. Dr. Albertini has served as Chief of Oncology at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital since January of 2003. He has been a mentor for clinical trainees with an interest in the care of melanoma patients, and has provided focused melanoma translational laboratory training to predoctoral, doctoral, and postdoctoral trainees in his research laboratory. Dr. Albertini has been a member of the Melanoma Committee in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group since 1994.

Research Interests: melanoma, T-cell immunology, cancer gene therapy, cancer vaccines

E-mail: mra@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Choi BS, Sondel PM, Hank JA, Schalch H, Gan J, King DM, Kendra K, Mahvi D, Lee LY, Kim KM and Albertini MR. Phase I Trial of Combined Treatment with CH14.18 and R24 Monoclonal Antibodies and Interleukin-2 for Patient with Melanoma or Sarcoma. Cancer Immunology Immunotherapy, 55:761-774, 2006.
  2. Cassaday RD, Sondel PM, King DM, Macklin MD, Gan J, Warner TF, Zuleger CL, Bridges AJ, Schalch HG, Kim KM, Hank JA, Mahvi DM and Albertini MR. A Phase I Study of Immunization Using Particle-Mediated Epidermal Delivery of Genes for gp100 and GM-CSF into Uninvolved Skin of Melanoma Patients. Clinical Cancer Research, 13(2): 540-549, 2007.
  3. Albertini MR, Macklin MD, Zuleger CL, Newton MA, Judice SA, Albertini RJ. Clonal expansions of 6-thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes in the blood and tumor of melanoma patients. Environ Mol Mutagen 49(9):676-687, 2008.
  4. Galili U, Albertini MR, Sondel PM, Wigglesworth K, Sullivan M, Whalen G. In situ conversion of melanoma lesions into autologous vaccine by intratumoral injections of a-gal glycolipids. Cancers 2:773-793, 2010. doi:10.3390/cancers2020773.
  5. Zuleger CL, Macklin MD, Bostwick BL, Pei Q, Newton MA, Albertini MR. In vivo 6-thioguanine-resistant T cells from melanoma patients have public TCR and share TCR beta amino acid sequences with melanoma-reactive T cells. J Immunol Methods, 2011 (In Press), doi: 10.1016/j.jim.2010.12.007.

Dr. Asimakopoulos joined the Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care division on May 1, 2010. He was born in Pyrgos, Peloponnese Greece and received his Bachelor of Science degree in Cellular and Molecular Pathology from University of Bristol, United Kingdom. His Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery and Doctorate of Philosophy were received from University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. His residency was conducted at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. His fellowship was completed at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York, NY. His research efforts focus on myeloma research and phase I experimental therapeutics. He will build on his previous work in the genetics of multiple myeloma, myeloma stem cells and the development of genetically engineered models for multiple myeloma. Fotis has previously contributed to the molecular mapping of 20q deletions (with Tony Green in Cambridge) and the epigenetics of clonal evolution of CML (with Dina Ben Yehuda in Jerusalem). With Harold Varmus he created a novel animal model for multiple myeloma. In addition Fotis is studying the genetic requirements for progression of myeloma and treatment response in the Vk*MYC myeloma model.

E-mail: fasimako@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Asimakopoulos F. and Varmus HE. Cell-Specific Transduction Of Blimp-1-expressing Lineages Mediated By A Receptor For Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup B. Journal of Virology, 83: 4835-4843, 2009.
  2. Asimakopoulos F. and Varmus HE. Gene targeting of germinal center centroblasts generated in vivo. Manuscript in preparation.
  3. Shteper PJ, Siegfried Z, Asimakopoulos F.A., Palumbo GA, Rachmilewitz EA, Ben-Neriah Y, Ben-Yehuda D. ABL1 methylation in Ph-positive ALL is exclusively associated with the P210 form of BCR-ABL. Leukemia, 15: 575-82, 2001.
  4. Asimakopoulos F.A., Shteper PJ, Krichevsky S, Fibach E, Polliack A, Rachmilewitz E, Ben-Neriah Y, Ben-Yehuda D. ABL1 Methylation is a Distinct Molecular Event Associated With Clonal Evolution of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. Blood, 94: 2452-60, 1999.
  5. Bench A.J., Aldred M.A., Humphray S.J., Champion K.M., Gilbert J.G., Asimakopoulos FA, Deloukas P., Gwilliam R., Bentley D.R., and Green A.R. A Detailed Physical And Transcriptional Map Of The Region Of Chromosome 20 That Is Deleted In Myeloproliferative Disorders And Refinement Of The Common Deleted Region. Genomics, 49: 351-362, 1998.

Justine Yang Bruce, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine. She attended the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and completed an internal medicine residency at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and a hematology/oncology fellowship at the University of Chicago. Dr. Bruce's clinical interests include genitourinary oncology and palliative care medicine. Her research interests involve the integration of hospice and palliative care into clinical trials for advanced cancer patients.

Research Interests: genitourinary oncology and palliative care

E-mail: jybruce@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Bruce, JY, Eickhoff J, Pili R, Logan T, Carducci M, Arnott J, Treston A, Wilding G, Liu G. "A phase II study of 2-methoxyestradiol nanocrystal colloidal dispersion alone and in combination with sunitinib malate in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma progressing on sunitinib malate." Invest New Drugs. 2010 Dec 22. PMID 21174224
  2. Bruce JY, Geary, D, de las Heras, B, Soto, A, Garcia Paramio, P, Yovine, A, Schilsky, RL, Undevia, SD, Ratain, MJ. "Phase I Study of PM02734: Association of Dose-Limiting Hepatotoxicity with Plasma Concentrations." American Society of Clinical Oncology Poster Discussion, May 31-June 3, 2008.
  3. Bruce JY, Hlubocky FJ, Daugherty CK. "Was It Worth It?" A Pilot Study of Advanced Cancer Patients' Retrospective Perceptions of Benefit from Phase I Trial Participation. Central Society for Clinical Research Poster Presentation, April 12-13, 2007.

Mark E. Burkard, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine who joined the UW in 2008. He specializes in breast oncology and developmental therapeutics. He obtained a PhD in chemistry and his MD from the University of Rochester in 2002, prior to postgraduate training at Cornell University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He co-directs the Breast Disease-Oriented Working Group, and focuses on clinical development of the UW breast cancer research program through collaborative efforts with basic researchers on the UW campus. The goal of his research laboratory is to develop personalized approaches to using kinase-targeted cancer therapies.

Research Interests: breast cancer and drug development

E-mail: meburkard@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Burkard ME, Jallepalli PV. Validating cancer drug targets through chemical genetics. Biochim Biophys Acta 2806:251, 2010.
  2. Randall CL, Burkard ME, Jallepalli PV. Polo kinase and cytokinesis initiation in Mammalian cells: harnessing the awesome power of chemical genetics. Cell Cycle. 2007 May;6(14):1713-7.
  3. Burkard ME, Randall CL, Larochelle S, Zhang C, Shokat KM, Fisher RP, Jallepalli PV. Chemical genetics reveals the requirement

Natalie Callander, MD, is a Professor of Medicine. She completed her residency at Bellevue Hospital in New York and her hematology/oncology fellowship at the University of California, San Diego. Her areas of interest include multiple myeloma and stem cell transplantation. Dr. Callander's research focuses on the development of novel treatments for multiple myeloma. She also is active in research regarding bone marrow transplantation and graft versus host disease. She is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.

Research Interests: multiple myeloma

E-mail: nsc@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Markovina S, Callander NS, O'Connor SL, Kim J, Werndli JE, Raschko M, Leith CP, Kahl BS, Kim K, Miyamoto S. Bortezomib-resistant nuclear factor-kappaB activity in multiple myeloma cells. Mol Cancer Res. 2008 Aug;6(8):1356-64.
  2. Chang JE, Juckett MB, Callander NS, Kahl BS, Gangnon RE, Mitchell TL, Longo WL. Thalidomide maintenance following high-dose melphalan with autologous stem cell support in myeloma. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma. 2008 Jun;8(3):153-8.
  3. McKibbin T, Burzynski J, Greene R, Ochoa-Bayona J, Tsai TW, Callander N, Freytes C. Paclitaxel and filgrastim for hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancies after failure of a prior mobilization regimen. Leuk Lymphoma. 2007 Dec;48(12):2360-6.
  4. Arango JI, Restrepo A, Schneider DL, Callander NS, Ochoa-Bayona JL, Restrepo MI, Bradshaw P, Patterson J, Freytes CO. Incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea before and after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2006 Mar;37(5):517-21.

Toby C. Campbell, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the hospice and palliative medicine fellowship director. Dr. Campbell received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Virginia and completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (UWHC). He completed fellowships in medical oncology and palliative medicine in 2007 at Northwestern University. Dr. Campbell's clinical practice interests are in lung cancer, symptom management and palliative care. His clinical research interests are in lung cancer therapeutics, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathic pain (CIPN), and communication.

Research Interests: lung cancer, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, communication.

E-mail: tcc@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Campbell TC, Jackson V, Carey E, et al. Discussing Prognosis : Balancing Hope and Realism. Cancer J. 2010 Sep-Oct; 16 (5): 461-6
  2. Campbell TC. "Medical Ethics in the ICU," Section Editor. ICU Recall, 3rd Edition. Tribble C, Thaemert N Eds. 2009, p 11-24.
  3. Campbell TC, Wood GJ, Knight CF. Communication and the Hospice and Palliative Physician's Role on the Interdisciplinary Team. UNIPAC 5, 3rd Ed. Storey CP, Levine S, Shega JW (editors). 2008.
  4. Campbell TC,Von Roenn JH. "Hematology and Oncology," in Palliative Care: Core Skills and Clinical Competencies, 1st Ed. Emanuel LL, Librach SL (editors), pp 307-325. 2007.
  5. Campbell TC, Von Roenn JH. "Palliative Care for Interventional Radiology: An Oncologist's Perspective," Semin Intervent Radiol 2007; 24: 375-381.

Julie E. Chang, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine. After graduating from Indiana University School of Medicine, she completed her internal medicine residency and hematology and oncology fellowships at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics and joined the faculty in 2007. Dr. Chang has special interest in lymphoma and complications of cancer involving the central nervous system.

Research Interests: lymphoma, experimental therapeutics and complications of cancer involving the central nervous system

E-mail: jc2@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Chang J, Juckett M, Callander N, et al. Maintenance thalidomide following high-dose melphalan with autologous stem cell support in multiple myeloma. Clinl Lymphoma Myeloma 2008; 8(3):153-158. PMID #18650178. NIHMSID 214799.
  2. Chang JE, Medlin SC, Kahl BS, et al. Augmented and standard Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster chemotherapy for treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Leuk Lymph 2008; 49(12):2298-2307. PMID #19052977, PMCID: PMC2844086.
  3. Chang JE, Voorhees PM, Kolesar JM, et al. Phase II study of arsenic trioxide and ascorbic acid for relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies: a Wisconsin Oncology Network study. Hematological Oncol 2009; 27:11-16. PMID #18668698. PMC2897137.
  4. Chang JE, Seo S, Kim KM, et al. Rituximab and CHOP chemotherapy plus GM-CSF for previously untreated diffuse large cell lymphoma in the elderly: a Wisconsin Oncology Network study. Clin Lymph Myeloma 2010; 10(5):379-384.
  5. Rocque GB, Malik JT, Yang DT, Chang JE. An unusual presentation of liver failure in a patient with primary gastrointestinal Hodgkin's lymphoma. Lymphoma 2011; 2011:1-5.

Michael (Eli) Eastman, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine who joined the faculty in August 2000. After completing medical school at the University of Colorado in 1994, he completed his residency and fellowship in oncology at UWHC. From August 2000 to October 2005, he served as medical oncologist with the Leonard C. Ferguson Cancer Center in Freeport, Illinois - a regional affiliate of the UWCCC. In October 2005, he was named medical director of the UW Cancer Center at Johnson Creek - a new collaboration among UW Health, Watertown Area Health Services and Fort HealthCare.

E-mail: eastman@wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Attia S, Eickhoff J, Wilding G, McNeel D, Blank J, Ahuja H, Jumonville A, Eastman M, Shevrin D, Glode M, Alberti D, Staab MJ, Horvath D, Straus J, Marnocha R, Liu G. Randomized, double-blinded phase II evaluation of docetaxel with or without doxercalciferol in patients with metastatic, androgen-independent prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 2008 Apr 15;14(8):2437-43.
  2. Walker L, Schalch H, King DM, Dietrich L, Eastman M, Kwak M, Kim K, Albertini MR. Phase II trial of weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced melanoma. Melanoma Res. 2005 Oct;15(5):453-9.
  3. Eastman ME, Khorsand M, Maki DG, Williams EC, Kim K, Sondel PM, Schiller JH, Albertini MR. Central venous device-related infection and thrombosis in patients treated with moderate dose continuous-infusion interleukin-2. Cancer. 2001 Feb 15;91(4):806-14.

Jacques Galipeau, MD, FRCP(C), is the Don and Marilyn Anderson Professor of Oncology within the Department of Medicine and UW Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and he is also Assistant Dean for Therapeutics Discovery and Development at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health. He is the founding director of the University of Wisconsin Advanced Cell Therapy Program whose mission is to develop personalized cell therapies for immune and malignant disorders and to promote and deploy first-in-human clinical trials of UWCCC cell therapy innovations to improve cancer outcomes for children and adults.

Dr. Galipeau is an internationally recognized expert in the field of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) biology and is the Chair of the International Society of Cell Therapy (ISCT) MSC committee. He is a NIH-funded expert in translational development of cell therapies and the sponsor of a series of FDA-sanctioned clinical trials examining the use of mesenchymal stromal cells for immune disorders, including Crohn’s disease, graft vs host disease and haploidentical BMT. He has also developed the field of fusion engineered cytokines known as fusokines, as a novel pharmaceutical means of treating immune disorders and cancer.

E-mail: jgalipeau@wisc.edu

Selected recent publications (from 161 total):

  1. Elizabeth O. Stenger, Raghavan Chinnadurai, Shala Yuan, Marco Garcia, Dalia Arafat, Greg Gibson, Lakshmanan Krishnamurti, and Jacques Galipeau. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells From Sickle Cell Disease Patients Display Intact Functionality. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2017 May;23(5):736-745. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.01.081. Epub 2017 Jan 26.
  2. Jiusheng Deng, Andrea Pennati, Shala Yuan, Jian Hui Wu, Krishnendu Roy, Edmund Waller, Jacques Galipeau. GM-CSF and IL-4 fusion cytokine Induces B Cell-dependent Hematopoietic Regeneration. Mol Ther. 2017 Feb 1;25(2):416-426. doi: 10.1016/j.ymthe.2016.11.013
  3. Andrea Pennati, Spencer Ng, Yuanqiang Wu, Jordan R. Murphy, Jiusheng Deng, Jennifer L. Blanchfield, Brian Evavold and Jacques Galipeau. Regulatory B cells induce formation of IL-10 expressing T cells in mice with autoimmune neuroinflammation. J Neurosci. 2016 Dec 14;36(50):12598-12610.
  4. Spencer Ng, Jiusheng Deng, Raghavan Chinnadurai, Shala Yuan, Andrea Pennati, Jacques Galipeau. Stimulation of natural killer cell-mediated tumor immunity by an IL-15/TGF-ß neutralizing fusion protein. Cancer Res. 2016 Oct 1;76(19):5683-5695.
  5. Raghavan Chinnadurai, Ian B Copland, Marco A Garcia, Christopher Petersen, Christopher Lewis, Edmund K. Waller, Allan Kirk, Jacques Galipeau. Cryopreserved MSCs are susceptible to T-cell mediated apoptosis which is partly rescued by IFNγ licensing. Stem Cells. 2016 Sep;34(9):2429-42. doi: 10.1002/stem.2415. Epub 2016 Jul 4.

Robert B. Hegeman, MD, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine and the Director of Outpatient Hematology/Oncology Services. He completed undergraduate training at the University of Kansas, and went on to complete medical school at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, where he received the Delp Award for Compassion in Medicine. He completed his internal medicine residency at Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and then stayed on as Chief Resident for one year and as faculty for an additional three years. He completed a medical oncology fellowship in the summer of 2005 at UWHC.

He cares for hematology and oncology patients at the UWCCC at 1 S. Park.

E-mail: robert.hegeman@uwmf.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Hegeman RB, Liu G, Wilding G, McNeel DG. Newer therapies in advanced prostate cancer. Clin Prostate Cancer. 2004 Dec;3(3):150-6.

Peiman Hematti, MD, is a Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery and Biomedical Engineering who joined our faculty in 2004. He received his medical degree from the Tehran University School of Medicine, completed a combined internal medicine/pediatrics residency at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and subsequently a fellowship in hematology at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the NIH. Following his clinical fellowship, he spent four years in the laboratory of Dr. Cynthia Dunbar studying hematopoietic stem cell biology using gene transfer methodology with special emphasis on nonhuman primate models. As a bone marrow transplant physician Dr. Hematti's clinical/translational research is focused on use of novel cellular therapies for treatment of malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Currently, Dr. Hematti is director of hematopoietic stem cell collection and apheresis at UW-Madison, and also director of clinical hematopoietic stem cell processing lab at UW-Hospital and Clinics. In those capacities he has been involved in development and implementation of many novel cellular therapies at UW-Madison. He has also been site-PI on several industry-sponsored clinical trials such as a phase-III clinical trial on use of BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Porchymal) in steroid refractory acute graft versus host disease. Most recently, UW-Madison has been awarded one of the only five NHLBI sponsored "Program Assistance for Cellular Therapies" in the country and as a co-investigator Dr. Hematti is in charge of generating clinical grade bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with the goal of using these cells for disorders such as graft versus host disease, and myocardial infarction. Dr. Hematti also has an active basic laboratory research program focused on the immunobiology of mesenchymal stem cells and their potential role in normal and abnormal tissue homeostasis, including their role in malignant hematopoiesis.

Research Interests: adult and embryonic hematopoiesis, novel cellular therapies, role of mesenchymal stem cells in normal tissue homeostasis and development of malignancies.

E-mail: pxh@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Kim J, Hematti P. Mesenchymal stem cell-educated macrophages: a novel type of alternatively activated macrophages. Experimental Hematology 37(12):1445-53, 2009.
  2. Trivedi P, Hematti P. Derivation and immunological characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells from human embryonic stem cells. Exp Hematol. 2008 Mar;36(3):350-9.
  3. Larochelle A, Krouse A, Metzger M, Orlic D, Donahue RE, Fricker S, Bridger G, Dunbar CE, Hematti P. AMD3100 mobilizes hematopoietic stem cells with long-term repopulating capacity in non-human primates. Blood 107(9): 3772-3778, 2006.
  4. Hematti P, Hong BK, Ferguson C, Adler R, Hanawa H, Sellers S, Holt IE, Eckfeldt CE, Sharma Y, Schmidt M, von Kalle C, Persons DA, Billings EM, Verfaillie CM, Nienhuis AW, Wolfsberg TG, Dunbar CE, Calmels B. Distinct genomic integration of MLV and SIV vectors in primate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. PLoS Biology 2(12):e423, 2004.
  5. Hematti P, Sellers SE, Agricola BA, Metzger ME, Donahue RE, Dunbar CE. Retroviral transduction efficiency of G-CSF+SCF mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells is superior to G-CSF or G-CSF+Flt3-L mobilized cells in nonhuman primates. Blood 101(6):2199-2205, 2003.

Mark Juckett, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Louisville and completed residency and fellowship at the University of Minnesota. He was appointed to the UW faculty in 2000. His clinical interests involve the care of patients with acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, other myeloid diseases and those patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Dr. Juckett's research focuses on the development of novel treatments for patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, with emphasis on Phase II trials, and emerging approaches to stem cell transplantation. He is a member of several professional organizations including the American Society of Hematology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.

Research Interests: bone marrow transplantation, acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome

E-mail: mbj@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Navarro WH, Agovi MA, Logan BR, Ballen K, Bolwell BJ, Frangoul H, Gupta V, Hahn T, Ho VT, Juckett M, Lazarus HM, Litzow MR, Liesveld JL, Moreb JS, Marks DI, McCarthy PL, Pasquini MC, Rizzo JD. Obesity does not preclude safe and effective myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in adults. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2010 Oct;16(10):1442-50.
  2. Vanderhoek M, Juckett MB, Perlman SB, Nickles RJ, Jeraj R. Early assessment of treatment response in patients with AML using [(18)F]FLT PET imaging. Leuk Res. 2010 Sep 15.
  3. Schaefer EW, Loaiza-Bonilla A, Juckett M, DiPersio JF, Roy V, Slack J, Wu W, Laumann K, Espinoza-Delgado I, Gore SD; Mayo P2C Phase II Consortium. A phase 2 study of vorinostat in acute myeloid leukemia. Haematologica. 2009 Oct;94(10):1375-82.
  4. Chang JE, Medlin SC, Kahl BS, Longo WL, Williams EC, Lionberger J, Kim K, Kim J, Esterberg E, Juckett MB. Augmented and standard Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster chemotherapy for treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Leuk Lymphoma. 2008 Dec;49(12):2298-307.
  5. Chang JE, Juckett MB, Callander NS, Kahl BS, Gangnon RE, Mitchell TL, Longo WL. Thalidomide maintenance following high-dose melphalan with autologous stem cell support in myeloma. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma. 2008 Jun;8(3):153-8.

Dr. Kenkre is an Assistant Professor of Medicine within the division of Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care at the UW >School of Medicine and Public Health and at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans >Hospital. She completed her medical degree at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and her postgraduate internship/residency training in Internal Medicine at the Tufts-New England Medical Center, in Boston, Massachusetts. Most recently, she completed her fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at the >University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, in 2010.

Dr. Kenkre’s clinical interests are in hematology, specifically lymphoma and bone marrow transplantation. Her research interests include clinical trials designed to improve therapeutic options for patients with lymphoma, along with a special interest in NK cell adoptive immunotherapy.

  1. Kenkre VP, Horowitz S, Artz AS, Liao C, Cohen KS, Godley LA, Kline JP, Smith SM, Stock W, van Besien K. T-cell-depleted allogeneic transplant without donor leukocyte infusions results in excellent long-term survival in patients with multiply relapsed Lymphoma. Predictors for survival after transplant relapse. Leuk Lymphoma 2010 Feb; 52(2):214-22.
  2. Kenkre VP, Kahl BS. Follicular lymphoma: emerging therapeutic strategies.Expert Review of Hematology 2010 Aug; 3(4): 485-95. Kenkre VP, Larson, RA. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Middle-Age and Older Adults, chapter in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: Biology and Treatment, Humana Press, in press.
  3. Kenkre VP, Stock W. Burkitt Lymphoma/Leukemia: Improving Prognosis. Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma 2009; 9Suppl 2: S231-8.
  4. Kenkre VP, Smith SM. Management of Relapsed Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma. Current Oncology Reports 2008 Sep; 10(5): 393-403.

Ticiana Leal, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health since 2009. She received her medical degree from the Federal University of Ceara in Brazil. She completed her internal medicine residency at University of Chicago Hospitals, followed by a geriatric/oncology fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a medical oncology fellowship at the University of Wisconsin. She holds certifications from the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine, geriatrics and oncology.

Dr. Leal treats general hematology/oncology patients at the Richland Center Hospital and at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital. Her clinical interests include breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancers and cancer in the older adult. Her research interests include clinical trial development and disparities in adherence to quality measures in older patients with cancer. She was awarded an oral presentation at the 9th Annual ECOG Young Investigator Symposium for her SEER-Medicare outcomes research. She is co-investigator of the Rural Oncology Literacy Enhancement Study (ROLES). Additionally she enjoys teaching medical students, residents and fellows.

Research Interests: gastrointestinal oncology, breast oncology and cancer in the older adult

E-mail: tbleal@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Leal T, Julie E. Chang, Minesh Mehta, H. Ian Robins. Leptomeningeal Metastasis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment. Accepted for publication Current Cancer Therapy Reviews, January 2011.
  2. Leal T, Tevaarwerk A, Love R, Stewart J, Binkley N, Eickhoff J, Parrot B, Mulkerin D. Randomized trial of adjuvant zoledronic acid (ZA) in postmenopausal women with high-risk breast cancer. Clinical Breast Cancer, Vol. 10, No. 6, 471-476, 2010.
  3. Lepeak L, Leal T, Robins H.I. Preclinical and Clinical Development of Velaparib (ABT-888): a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Drugs of the Future, 35(10): 815-822, 2010.
  4. Leal T, Kolesar J. Pharmacokinetic / Pharmacodynamic monitoring in clinical trials: When is it needed? Fundamentals of Oncology Clinical Trials. 2010 Editors Kelly & Halabi.
  5. Leal T, Robins HI. Bevacizumab induced reversible thrombocytopenia in a patient with recurrent high-grade glioma: a case report. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2010 Jan; 65(2):399-401.

Glenn Liu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine who joined the faculty in 2003. He specializes in genitourinary (GU) oncology and experimental therapeutics. He is the leader of the UWCCC GU Research Program and co-leader of the GU Oncology Disease-Oriented Working Group (DOWG) and Translational Imaging Research Group. He assumed the role as the Director of the UWCCC Phase I Program in 2011, thus is highly active in clinical and translational research. Dr. Liu is a member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) GU and Developmental Therapeutics Committee. He is chair of the Mayo Phase 2 Consortium GU Working Group and currently serves on National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee's Angiogenesis Task Force and NCI GU Steering Committee's Prostate Cancer Task Force.

Research Interests: angiogenesis, molecular imaging, bone imaging, and early drug development.

E-mail: gxl@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Liu G, Kelly, WK, Wilding G, Leopold L, Brill K, and Somer B. An Open-Label, Multicenter, Phase I/II Study of Single-Agent AT-101 in Men with Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC). Clin Cancer Res 15:3172-76, 2009.
  2. Harrison M, Hahn N, Pili R, Oh WK, Sweeny C, Kim K, Perlman S, Arnott J, Sidor C, Wilding G, and Liu G. A phase II study of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) nanocrystal dispersion (NCD) in patients with taxane-refractory, metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Invest New Drugs (ePub) May 2010. PMID 20499131
  3. Bruce JY, Eickhoff J, Pili R, Logan T, Carducci M, Arnott J, Treston A, Wilding G, and Liu G. A Phase II Study of 2-Methoxyestradiol Nanocrystal Colloidal Dispersion Alone and in Combination with Sunitinib Malate in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Progressing on Sunitinib Malate. Invest New Drugs (
  4. Tevaawerk A, Wilding G, Alberti D, Oliver K, Eickhoff J, Sidor C, Arnott J, and
    Liu G. Phase I study of continuous MKC-1 in patients with advanced or metastatic solid malignancies using the modified Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method (TITE-CRM) dose escalation design. Accepted for publication 12/28/2010 in Invest New Drugs.
  5. Liu G, Chen Y, Kolesar J, Huang W, DiPaola W, Pins M, Carducci M, Stein M, Bubley G, and Wilding G. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II Trial of Lapatinib in Men with Biochemically Relapsed, Androgen-Dependent Prostate Cancer. Accepted for publication 1/1/2011 in Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations.

Noelle K. LoConte, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine. She finished medical school at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and there was awarded membership in Alpha Omega Alpha. She completed her internship in internal medicine at the UW. Dr. LoConte completed her internal medicine residency at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland. She completed fellowships in both medical oncology and geriatrics at UWHC. She is a recipient of an American Society of Clinical Oncology Young Investigator Award for 2006. She joined our faculty in 2006 on the K12 Clinical Academic Physician development grant. She is the chairperson of the Wisconsin Cancer Council, and is active in the Department of Population Health Sciences. She is in the Masters of Population Health Sciences program. She is also active within ECOG as well as our phase I program. Dr. LoConte's clinical interests are in gastrointestinal cancers, as well as cancer of any type in the older adult. Dr. LoConte's research interests are in predictors of chemotherapy toxicity and effects of chemotherapy in older adults, as well as chemotherapy trials for gastrointestinal cancers. She is currently developing a geriatric oncology clinic and research program as well as the pancreas cancer chemotherapy trials at the UW.

Research Interests: chemotherapy toxicity, pancreas cancer, SEER-Medicare, Phase I trials, geriatric oncology, gastrointestinal oncology

E-mail: ns3@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Optimizing Surgical Care of Colon Cancer in the Older Adult Population. Kennedy GD, Rajamanickam V, Oʼconnor ES, Loconte NK, Foley EF, Leverson G, Heise CP. Ann Surg. 2010 Dec 16. [Epub ahead of print]PMID: 21169811
  2. A phase II study of oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and high-dose capecitabine in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Lubner SJ, Loconte NK, Holen KD, Schelman W, Thomas JP, Jumonville A, Eickhoff JC, Seo S, Mulkerin DL.Clin Colorectal Cancer. 2010 Jul;9(3):157-61.PMID: 20643620
  3. Report of a multicenter phase II trial testing a combination of biweekly bevacizumab and daily erlotinib in patients with unresectable biliary cancer: a phase II Consortium study.Lubner SJ, Mahoney MR, Kolesar JL, Loconte NK, Kim GP, Pitot HC, Philip PA, Picus J, Yong WP, Horvath L, Van Hazel G, Erlichman CE, Holen KD. J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jul 20;28(21):3491-7. Epub 2010 Jun 7.PMID: 20530271
  4. Readmission after colectomy for cancer predicts one-year mortality.Greenblatt DY, Weber SM, O'Connor ES, LoConte NK, Liou JI, Smith MA. Ann Surg. 2010 Apr;251(4):659-69.PMID: 20224370
  5. Perceived stigma, self-blame, and adjustment among lung, breast and prostate cancer patients.Else-Quest NM, LoConte NK, Schiller JH, Hyde JS. Psychol Health. 2009 Oct;24(8):949-64.

Douglas G. McNeel, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Medicine and genitourinary medical oncologist with a clinical and research focus on prostate cancer immunology. He is the director of the T32 Physician Scientist Training Grant. He graduated from medical school from the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine and completed his internship, residency and fellowship at the University of Washington, Seattle. Since 1997 he and his laboratory have studied vaccines for prostate cancer, specifically identifying antigens to target in vaccines, testing the ability of vaccines to eliminate prostate cancer cells, and translating these studies to human clinical trials.

Research Interests: prostate cancer, cancer vaccines

E-mail: dm3@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Maricque BB, Eickhoff JC, McNeel DG. (2011) "Antibody responses to prostate-associated antigens in patients with prostatitis and prostate cancer." Prostate 71:134-146.
  2. Becker JT, Olson BM, Johnson LE, Davies JG, Dunphy EJ, and McNeel DG. (2010) "DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) elicits long-term T-cell responses in patients with recurrent prostate cancer." J Immunotherapy 33:639-647.
  3. Olson BM, Frye TP, Johnson LD, Fong L, Knutson KL, Disis ML, and McNeel DG. (2010) "HLA-A2-restricted T-cell epitopes specific for prostatic acid phosphatase." Cancer Immunol. Immunother. 59:943-953.
  4. McNeel DG, Dunphy EJ, Davies JG, Frye TP, Johnson LE, Staab MJ, Horvath DL, Straus J, Alberti D, Marnocha R, Liu G, Eickhoff JC, and Wilding G. (2009) "Safety and immunological efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in patients with stage D0 prostate cancer." J. Clin. Oncol. 27:4047-
  5. Alam S and McNeel DG. (2010) "DNA vaccines for the treatment of prostate cancer." Exp. Rev. Vaccines 9:731-745.

Daniel Mulkerin, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Medical Director of the UWCCC and Director of the Gastrointestinal Disease Oriented Working Group. Dr. Mulkerin joined the UW Medical School faculty in 1999. He graduated from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and then completed a residency in internal medicine and fellowship in medical oncology at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. His clinical expertise is in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies.

Research Interests: Phase I trials, gastrointestinal oncology

E-mail: dm2@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Mulkerin D, Loconte NK, Holen KD, Thomas JP, Alberti D, Marnocha R, Kolesar J, Eickhoff J, Oliver K, Feierabend C, Wilding G. A phase I study of an oral simulated FOLFOX with high dose capecitabine. Invest New Drugs. 2009 Jan 8. [Epub ahead of print]
  2. Attia S, Morgan-Meadows S, Holen KD, Bailey HH, Eickhoff JC, Schelman WR, Traynor AM, Mulkerin DL, Campbell TC, McFarland TA, Huie MS, Cleary JF, Tevaarwerk AJ, Alberti DB, Wilding G, Liu G. Dose-escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine combined with capecitabine in advanced solid malignancies. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2008 Oct 8. [Epub ahead of print]
  3. Gibbons J, Egorin MJ, Ramanathan RK, Fu P, Mulkerin DL, Shibata S, Takimoto CH, Mani S, LoRusso PA, Grem JL, Pavlick A, Lenz HJ, Flick SM, Reynolds S, Lagattuta TF, Parise RA, Wang Y, Murgo AJ, Ivy SP, Remick SC; National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of imatinib mesylate in patients with advanced malignancies and varying degrees of renal dysfunction: a study by the National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group. J Clin Oncol. 2008 Feb 1;26(4):570-6.
  4. Ramanathan RK, Egorin MJ, Takimoto CH, Remick SC, Doroshow JH, LoRusso PA, Mulkerin DL, Grem JL, Hamilton A, Murgo AJ, Potter DM, Belani CP, Hayes MJ, Peng B, Ivy SP; National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of imatinib mesylate in patients with advanced malignancies and varying degrees of liver dysfunction: a study by the National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group. J Clin Oncol. 2008 Feb 1;26(4):563-9.

Michele Pipp-Dahm, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine and joined the faculty in January 2007. Following a medical oncology fellowship at the UWHC, she was a staff oncologist at Monroe Clinic and Hospital from 2001 to 2003. In 2003, she joined the staff of HospiceCare, Inc., in Madison, serving as its inpatient medical director until 2006. In addition to seeing patients at the UWCCC, Dr. Pipp treats general hematology/oncology patients at the Monroe Clinic and Hospital and at Reedsburg Memorial Hospital.

E-mail: mlp@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Pipp M, Mulkerin M, Warren D, Hotchkis W, Berlin J, Thomas JP. A Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine and 5-Fluoruracil in Advanced Esophageal Cancer. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 20: 2001 (abstr 630)
  2. Pipp ML, Means ND, Sixbey JW, Morris KL, Gue CL, Baddour LM.Acute Epstein-Barr virus infection complicated by severe thrombocytopenia. Clin Infect Dis. 1997 Nov;25(5):1237-9.

H. Ian Robins, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Medicine, Human Oncology, and Neurology; he is active investigator in the area of neuro-oncology. He has been in the past and is currently a principal investigator on various NIH/NCI cooperative group protocols, including the North American Brain Tumor Consortium, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and the Adult Brain Tumor Consortium.

Research Interests: central nervous system malignancies and breast cancer

E-mail: hirobins@wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Chakravarti A, WangM, Robins HI, et al.; RTOG 0211: A Phase I/II Study of Radiation Therapy with Concurrent Gefitinib for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 85(5):1206-1211, 2012.
  2. Vivanco I, Robins HI, Rohle D, etal, Differential Sensitivity of Glioma- versus Lung Cancer- specific EGFR mutations to EGFR. Cancer Discovery; 2: 458-471, 2012.
  3. Sperduto PM, WangM, Robins HI, etal. A Phase III Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy (WBRT) and Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) Alone Versus WBRT & SRS with TemozolomideTMZ) or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1-3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320 Int JRadiat Oncol Biol Phys.85:1312-318, 2013.
  4. Kruser T, Mehta M, Robins HI. Pseudoprogression after Glioma Therapy: A Comprehensive Review. Expert Rev Neurother 13 (4) 389-403, 2013.
  5. Magnuson W, Robins HI, Mohindra P, Howard S,Large Volume Reirradiation as Salvage Therapy for Glioblastoma after Progression onBevacizumab, Neuro-oncology.2014 Mar;117(1):133-9.

John Sheehan, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Principal Investigator of the Research Training in Hematology T32 grant. He earned his medical degree from the University of Missouri in Columbia. He completed his residency at the University of Minnesota. His fellowship work was completed at Washington University in St. Louis. His research currently focuses on regulation of the protease factor IXa within the intrinsic tenase (factors IXa‐VIIIa) complex, and identification of novel molecular targets for antithrombotic therapy.

Research Interests: regulation of coagulation, thrombotic disorders

E-mail: jps@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Sheehan, J.P. and Walke, E.N. (2006) Depolymerized Holothurian Glycosaminoglycan and Heparin Inhibit the Intrinsic Tenase Complex by a Common Antithrombin-Independent Mechanism. Blood 107(10):3876-82. PMCID: PMC1895295
  2. Misenheimer, T.M., Buyue, Y., and Sheehan, J.P. (2007) The Heparin-binding Exosite is Critical to Allosteric Activation of Factor IXa in the Intrinsic Tenase Complex: The role of arginine 165 and factor X. Biochemistry 46(26):7886-95. PMCID: PMC2569175
  3. Buyue, Y., Whinna, H., Sheehan, J.P. (2008) The Heparin-Binding Exosite of Factor IXa is a Critical Regulator of Plasma Thrombin Generation and Venous Thrombosis. Blood, 112(8): 3234-3241. [Epub Jul 22, 2008]. PMCID: PMC2569175
  4. Buyue, Y., and Sheehan, J.P. (2009) Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate Inhibits Plasma Thrombin Generation via Targeting of the Factor IXa Heparin-Binding Exosite. Blood 114 (14) 3092-100 [Epub May 4, 2009]. PMCID: PMC275621
  5. Misenheimer, T.M., and Sheehan, J.P. (2010) The Regulation of Factor IXa by Super-sulfated Low Molecular Weight Heparin. Biochemistry 49(46):9997-10005. Epub 2010 Oct 2
  6. Buyue, Y., and Sheehan, J.P. Low Molecular Weight Heparin Inhibits Thrombin Generation via Direct Targeting of Factor IXa: Contribution of the serpin-independent mechanism in human plasma (submitted for publication).

Amyé Tevaarwerk, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine. She completed medical school at Washington University in St. Louis, and her internship and internal medicine residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. Her fellowship in Medical Oncology was completed at the University of Wisconsin. She is interested in the development of new therapeutic agents for breast cancer, with a focus on targeted therapies. Dr. Tevaarwerk currently has a number of Phase I and II trials for which she serves as Principle Investigator. She is also currently collaborating with Dr. David Beebe (Biomedical Engineering) on a new method for detecting and possibly culturing circulating tumor cells. She is active within the Wisconsin Oncology Network, the Mayo Phase II Consortium and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Other interests include creating a breast cancer survivorship program at the University, which includes a collaboration with Mary Sesto (Human Factors Engineering) to better understand the factors and impediments with respect to returning to work.

Research Interests: breast cancer survivorship, phase I trials.

E-mail: at4@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Kanagawa O, Xu G, Tevaarwerk A, Vaupel BA. Protection of nonobese diabetic mice from diabetes by gene(s) closely linked to IFN-gamma receptor loci. J Immunol 164(7):3919-23, 2000. Free article available at: http://www.jimmunol.org/content/164/7/3919.long
  2. Attia S, Morgan-Meadows S, Holen KD, Bailey HH, Eickhoff JC, Schelman WR, Traynor AM, Mulkerin DL, Campbell TC, McFarland TA, Huie MS, Cleary JF, Tevaarwerk AJ, Alberti DB, Wilding G, Liu G. Dose-escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine combined with capecitabine in advanced solid malignancies. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 64(1):45-41, 2009. PMCID: PMC2676212
  3. Tevaarwerk AJ, Holen KD, Alberti DB, Sidor C, Arnott J, Quon C, Wilding G, Liu G. Phase I trial of 2-methoxyestradiol NanoCrystal dispersion in advanced solid malignancies. Clin Cancer Res 15(4):1460-5, 2009. PMCID: PMC2892631
  4. Tevaarwerk, AJ; Kolesar, J. Lapatinib: a small-molecule inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 tyrosine kinases used in the treatment of breast cancer. Clin Ther 31 Pt 2:2232-48, 2009.
  5. Leal T, Tevaarwerk AJ, Love R, Stewart JA, Binkley N, Eickhoff J, Parrot B, Mulkerin D. Randomized trial of adjuvant zoledronic acid (ZA) in postmenopausal women with high risk breast cancer. Accepted 4/2010. NIHMSID# 201008.

Anne M. Traynor, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine who has been on the faculty since 2002 and specializes in lung cancer and early drug development. She is the Leader of the Thoracic Oncology Disease Oriented Working Group and has directed the Wisconsin Oncology Network, a partnership of the UWCCC and 17 heme/onc groups around the state that conducts phase II clinical oncology trials, since 2003. She also chairs the UWCCC Data and Safety Monitoring Committee, which oversees the conduct of all clinical research performed at the UWCCC. Dr. Traynor obtained an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from North Carolina State University and her medical degree from the University of North Carolina. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, NY, and obtained her fellowship training in medical oncology from the University of Iowa.

Research Interests: lung oncology, Phase I trials

E-mail: amt@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. O'Mahar SE, Campbell TC, Hoang T, Seo S, Kim KM, Larson MM, Marcotte SM, LoConte NK, and Traynor AM. Phase I study of sunitinib and erlotinib in advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer. J Thoracic Oncol 2011 [Epub ahead of print Jan 2011].
  2. Kruser TJ, Traynor AM, and Wheeler DL. The use of single-agent dasatinib in molecularly unselected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2011 [Epub ahead of print Jan 2011].
  3. Traynor AM, Hewitt M, Liu G, Flaherty KT, Clark J, Freedman SJ, Scott BB, Leighton AM, Watson PA, Zhao B, O'Dwyer PJ, Wilding G. Phase I dose escalation study of MK-0457, a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor, in adult patients with advanced solid tumors. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 2011;67:305-14.
  4. Traynor AM, Lee J-W, Bayer GK, Tate JM, Thomas SP, Mazurczak M, Graham DL, Kolesar JM, and Schiller JH. A phase II trial of Triapine® (NSC# 663249) and gemcitabine as second line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study 1503. Invest New Drugs 2010;28:91-7.

Eliot C. Williams, MD, PhD, is Professor of Medicine, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Vice-Chair of the Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care Division. He is also the Director of the Special Coagulation lab and Director of the Adult Bleeding Disorders program. He received a PhD in Biochemistry, as well as his medical degree, from Indiana University. He completed his internship, residency and fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. His clinical interests include the treatment of bleeding and clotting disorders and leukemia.

Research Interests: diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and clotting disorders

E-mail: williams@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

  1. Chang JE, Medlin SC, Kahl BS, Longo WL, Williams EC, Lionberger J, Kim K, Kim J, Esterberg E, Juckett MB. Augmented and standard Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster chemotherapy for treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Leuk Lymphoma. 2008 Dec;49(12):2298-307.
  2. Young KH, Zhang D, Malik JT, Williams EC. Fulminant EBV-driven CD8 T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Following Primary Acute EBV Infection: A Unique Spectrum of T-Cell Malignancy. Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 2008 Jan 1;1(2):185-97.
  3. Kujawski LA, Longo WL, Williams EC, Turman NJ, Brandt N, Mosher DF, Eickhoff JC, Kahl BS. A 5-drug regimen maximizing the dose of cyclophosphamide is effective therapy for adult Burkitt or Burkitt-like lymphomas.Cancer Invest. 2007 Mar;25(2):87-93.
  4. Kahl BS, Bailey HH, Smith EP, Turman N, Smith J, Werndli J, Williams EC, Longo WL, Kim KM, McGovern J, Jumonville A. Phase II study of weekly low-dose paclitaxel for relapsed and refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a Wisconsin Oncology Network Study. Cancer Invest. 2005;23(1):13-8.

Kari Braun Wisinski, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine. Dr. Wisinski earned her medical degree at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. She then completed her internal medicine residency at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado followed by a combined hematology/oncology fellowship at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois. As a fellow, her research was supported by a T32 grant. Dr. Wisinski joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin in 2008. She is a member of the UW breast disease-oriented working group and the phase I research group. Her research is focused on novel drug development and on identifying predictive markers for targeted therapies used in breast cancer treatment. In 2010, Dr. Wisinski started the breast cancer risk assessment and intervention clinic for women at significant risk for breast cancer.

Research Interests: Phase I trials, predictive markers, breast oncology

E-mail: kbwisinski@medicine.wisc.edu

Selected Publications:

 

  1. Pasche B, Wisinski KB, Sadim M, Kaklamani V, Pennison M, Zeng Q, Bellam N, Zimmerman J, Yi N, Zhang K, Baron J, O'Stram D, Hayes G. Constutively decreased TGFBR1 allelic expression is a common finding in colorectal cancer and is associated with three TGFBR1 SNPs. J Exp Clin Cancer Res 2010 May 25;29:57. PMC2890549
  2. Wisinski KB, Gradishar, WJ. Inhibitors of Tumor Angiogenesis. Cancer Chemotherapy and Biotherapy (5th Edition). New York: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2010.
  3. Wisinski KB, Gradishar WJ. Male Breast Cancer. Diseases of the Breast (4th Edition) New York: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009.
  4. Kaklamani VG, Wisinski KB, Sadim M, Gulden C, Do A, Offit K, Baron JA, Ahsan H, Mantzoros C, Pasche B. Variants of the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) genes and colorectal cancer risk. JAMA. 2008 Oct 1;300(13):1523-31.
  5. Shankaran V, Wisinski KB, Mulcahy MF, Benson AB 3rd. The role of molecular markers in predicting response to therapy in patients with colorectal cancer. Mol Diagn Ther. 2008;12(2):87-98.