University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Tobey Betthauser, PHD, MS

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

GERIATRICS Faculty

CLINICAL SCIENCE CENTER
600 HIGHLAND AVE
MADISON, WI 53792-0001

(608) 262-1663

Education

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison – MS
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison – PhD in Medical Physics
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center – Fellowship in Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers and cognition

Professional Activities

Dr Betthauser is a faculty member in the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology within the Department of Medicine. His background includes research expertise in positron emission tomography neuroimaging and the study of Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers and prevention. Dr. Betthauser currently serves on Executive Committees for the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (WRAP), and the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (WADRC). He also serves as a clinical theme co-chair for the annual Human Amyloid Imaging Conference. Dr Betthauser is a member of the International Society to Advance Alzheimer Research and Treatment, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He has received multiple travel awards and mentored research awards including an Alzheimer’s Association Research Fellowship, and initial and renewal awards from the National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Aging Loan Repayment Program. He has also received two Alavi-Mandell Publication Awards from the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging for works published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Research Interests

View Dr. Tobey Betthauser's publications on NCBI MyBibliography.

Dr. Betthauser is interested in understanding the chronological sequence of events in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) using neuroimaging and fluid biomarkers. The central focus of his research lab is to better understand and characterize the earliest detectable changes in AD using biomarkers, and characterize how these biomarker changes can inform patient prognosis and improve diagnostic accuracy of AD during life. Dr. Betthauser is committed to developing practical tools that can be integrated into the clinic to improve patient care and management.