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Research

The Department of Medicine enjoys a long history of scholarly pursuit and currently receives over $80 million per year in research funding. Total research expenditures on the UW-Madison campus ranks us among the top three for public universities. Our residents avail themselves of these impressive opportunities and publish or present about 50 articles or abstracts annually.

Nationally recognized programs on campus include:

Aging: 

Alzheimer's Disease: 

Asthma:

Biochemistry:

Biotechnology:

Cancer: 

Cariovascular Medicine: 

Clinical Trials: 

Developmental Disabilities: 

Gender: 

Neuroscience:

Public Health/Health Disparities:

Primate Research: 

Psychology: 

Sleep:

Stem Cells:

Technology/Imaging: 

Transdisciplinary: 

Tobacco:

Toxicology: 

Vision:

Other University of Wisconsin Centers & Institutes:

 

In addition, several graduate training programs and focused research groups are found throughout the School of Medicine and Public Health and the Graduate School, including programs in:

All residents participate in a scholarly project during their training. Projects range from scholarly reviews of clinical topics to clinical or basic science research. Mentorship is available under the auspices of the Department of Medicine researchers and investigators in clinical and basic sciences, social sciences, veterinary medicine, preventive medicine, epidemiology, engineering, and population health. Residents presenting their research at regional or national meetings have their expenses covered by the Department of Medicine. Clerical support and mentorship is offered to all residents to help facilitate those interested in authoring their project for publication.

Our residents who wish to pursue scholarly careers have several resources in our department to support their work. For example, under Department of Medicine leadership, our School of Medicine and Public Health received an NIH Roadmap Initiative Clinical and Translational Science Award $50 million grant to train the next generation of patient-oriented researchers and our graduates have benefited greatly from this resource, which is directed through the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. In addition, training grants are available to support postgraduate salaries fully while graduate school work and research can be pursued with over 75% protected time. Many of these grants cover tuition for graduate school and there is an opportunity to compete for NIH-funded loan forgiveness.