University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Current and Recent IMPACT Physician Scientist Trainees

Current Trainees

John Ebben, MD, PhD

Education:
BS, Biomedical Science, Political Science, Marquette University, 2010
MD/PhD, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2018
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Heme/Onc Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

I have always been drawn to both science and medicine by the potential to have a meaningful impact on human health. My research interests center on the intersection of developmental biology and tumorigenesis, with an eye toward evaluating the means by which tumors generate immune privilege. My interest was nurtured early on by supportive UW faculty (John S. Kuo, MD, PhD) when I was an undergraduate participating in summer research at UW. As I progressed through medical and graduate school, I also came to realize that I wanted to develop a career as a physician-scientist that included the translation of basic science into clinical medicine -- and that this would involve developing clinical acumen, and both research and entrepreneurial expertise -- all of which UW seeks to cultivate.

Patrick Grogan, MD, PhD

Education:
BS, Biochemistry; Neuroscience; Genetics, Cell Biology & Development; and Physiology, Univ of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 2009
MD/PhD, Univ of Kansas School of Medicine, 2016
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Heme/Onc Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

Marina Sharifi, MD, PhD

Education:
BS, Molecular Biology; German Studies, Univ of California-Berkeley, 2006
MD/PhD, Univ of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, 2016
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Heme/Onc Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

Lindsay Taylor, MD

Education:
BS, Medical Microbiology and Immunology, UW-Madison, 2011
MD, UW School of Medicine and Public Health, 2016
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Infectious Disease Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

My long-term goal is to become an academic physician-scientist leading an independent research program to combat antimicrobial resistance in resource limited settings. My interests in antimicrobial resistance began during my undergraduate studies in microbiology. These interests were further fostered during a gap year experience working with the Tibetan population in India, when I learned the difficulties of treating multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. During medical school, I started working with my current research mentor, Christopher Crnich, MD, PhD, focusing research efforts on antimicrobial stewardship in the long-term care setting. Since starting my second year of fellowship, my work focuses antibiogram use in the nursing home setting.

Jeremy Kratz, MD

Education:
BS, Molecular & Cellular Biology, Univ of Michigan-Ann Arbor, 2011
MD, Univ of Michigan Medical School, 2015
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Heme/Onc Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

As a post-doctoral research fellow, my research is focused on assessing clinically relevant heterogeneity in advanced GI cancers in the McArdle laboratory of Dr. Dustin Deming. Using patient-derived organotypic cancer spheroids, I assess response heterogeneity for cultures derived from individual patients including the UW Precision Medicine and Molecular Tumor Board and UW Rectal Cancer Registry. These cultures are studied using dose escalation strategies to develop targeted therapy resistance as the basis for mechanistic studies to tune targeted strategies and improve clinical outcomes.

Nan Sethakorn, MD, PhD

Education:
BS, Biological Sciences, Univ of Illinois-Chicago, 2005
MD/PhD, Univ of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, 2015
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Heme/Onc Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

Faculty Members

Education:
BA, Molecular Biology, Univ of Pennsylvania
MD/PhD, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Rheumatology Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

Current Position: Assistant Professor, Rheumatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I thought UW-Madison would be an exceptional place to do residency, fellowship, and research training as part of the ABIM research [physician-scientist] pathway. There appeared to be high quality clinical training and numerous options for exciting research. I have been focused on a research career since college. In preparation for a career that combined research and medicine I completed the MD/PhD program during medical school.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    Dr. Anna Huttenlocher has been my closest research mentor and she has generously allowed me access to all the equipment and resources of her large research lab. In her lab, I have pursued some research projects that are closely aligned with her work, which has given me a strong foundation in cell biology to complement my background in molecular biology and immunology. She also generously gave me the freedom to pursue my independent ideas even though they are much more loosely connected to her lab's mission. Pursing my own research projects has allowed me to develop a strong foundation in arthritis research as well as provided me with data and tools that I can use to start my own independent research lab.

    Dr. Kevin McKown, the rheumatology division chief, has been instrumental in promoting my career at every step. He has generously nominated me for numerous awards, and has strongly protected my research time.

    Dr. Richard Page has been highly supportive of my career and has been instrumental in my promotion to an assistant professor.

    Because of the tremendous number of top-notch researchers and the collegial atmosphere, I have been able to turn to numerous faculty members for both scientific and career advice (including, among others, Molly CarnesDeane MosherDawn DavisKaren HansenLoren DenlingerNizar JarjourNaomi Chesler and Fotios Asimakopoulos). I have also had the opportunity to collaborate with bioengineers, biochemists, pathologists, and radiologists across campus on a number of projects. These collaborations have improved both the quality and breadth of my research.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    They can expect high quality clinical training and a tremendous number of options with regard to research areas. Further, faculty are always happy to meet to give career advice.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    Drs. McKown, Page, Bridges, and Huttenlocher have been very supportive in my candidacy for a tenure track assistant professor position. I have been offered a generous start-up package with renovated lab space at the VA which will allow me the time, resources, and space needed for success!

Education:
MD/PhD, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
Internal Medicine Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital
Geriatrics Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Current Position: Associate Professor, Geriatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I did residency at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, but returned to the UW for my geriatrics fellowship. I fell in love with health services research during my geriatrics fellowship. I found that it was a discipline in which I could combine my love for scientific inquiry with my desire to better the health of vulnerable older adults.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    Sanjay AsthanaMolly Carnes and Maureen Smith (all UW faculty) have been fundamentally important in helping me to build a solid research foundation. They are knowledgeable, approachable and insightful-- I am extremely fortunate to have them as mentors.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    UW offers a fantastic array of services to support your research career development both in residency and fellowship. Opportunities for additional formal and informal research training abound. There are many research-focused faculty who are performing ground-breaking work, and who are available to help in developing the research careers of students interested in pursuing this pathway.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    After my geriatrics fellowship, I participated in a 2-year older women's health research fellowship housed at Madison VA hospital (directly affiliated with the UW) and then was awarded a KL2 career development award through the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, prior to obtaining K23 funding through the National Institute on Aging. The UW has provided me with amazing mentoring, training and research support throughout my post-residency period.

Education:
MD, Univ of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry
MS, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Gastroenterology & Hepatology Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

​​​​​​​Current Position: Associate Professor, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I selected UW-Madison for a few reasons. One major reason is that it offers outstanding programs in so many areas. I didn't know I wanted to have a career focused on research when I began residency, but I knew that I wanted a program that would offer me excellent training in whatever career path I chose. It wasn't until after I was exposed to so many inspiring clinician-scientists at the UW that I decided to pursue further training in research during my fellowship training.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    The GI fellowship program was very supportive of my desire to obtain further training in research and worked with me to organize my clinical training schedule around the classes I needed to take for a Master's degree in Population Health Sciences. I also received support from the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research with pilot funding for a grant that is the foundation of my research program and opportunities for learning more skills and finding collaborators across campus. But, the most important resource for helping to create a solid foundation for my research has been the UW Health Innovation Program (Director: Maureen Smith, MD, PhD, MPH). As an investigator with the Health Innovation Program, I have access to programmers, statisticians, grant writing groups, and seminars where I can network with health services researchers in other fields.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    My biggest piece of advice is to be open to all methods of research - "research" doesn't always mean experiments in petri dishes. There are very exciting things happening in translational research where we aim to bring findings "from the bench to the bedside". I encourage students to explore areas such as health services research and community-based participatory research and to basically, keep an open mind.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    Every part of my research career has been supported by the UW - I received my Master's degree from the Population Health Department here, I was supported for two years after my clinical fellowship on a T32 grant in the Population Health Department, my research has been funded by an institutional grant, and I have amazing resources from the Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and the Health Innovation Program. In short, I wouldn't be able to do my research without the support I have from the UW.

Heather Johnson, MD, MS

Education:
BS, Molecular Biology, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison
MD, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
MS, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

​​​​​​​Current Position: Associate Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I was focused on an academic research career when I started residency. I selected UW-Madison for Internal Medicine residency because of its outstanding national reputation in research, education, and clinical care.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    I have had wonderful mentors at UW (Jim Stein and Molly Carnes). The relationships with my mentors continue to grow and I appreciate their time and commitment.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    UW has numerous support services to help an individual grow and develop towards a successful career in academic medicine. The guidance and mentorship helps students to balance clinical and research training.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    I am very grateful for the research opportunities, time, and funding that UW has provided.

Former Residents

Education:
BS, Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Marquette University
MD, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Medical Oncology Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

Current Position: Associate Professor, Hematology/Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I selected UW Madison for my residency program for multiple reasons. It is a great internal medicine program that I knew would propel me to be the best clinician I could be. Also, I knew that I wanted an academic research career and this program allowed me protected time and mentoring to pursue the type of research that I was in. This has helped me advance towards my goal of being an independent physician-scientist.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    Two keys to creating a solid foundation for a research career are obtaining protected time to perform your research and developing a relationship with a mentor who is committed to your career development. The residency program allowed me the flexibility to undergo my clinical training, but also maintain adequate dedicated time for research. Drs. Schelman, Holen, and Halberg all have gone above and beyond in assisting me with my career development. They have taught me many of the skills I need to be an independent investigator, but has also taken interest to increase my local and national exposure. Beyond my research mentors, the entire Department of Medicine has been extremely helpful. There is not a physician that I have worked with that I couldn't email or meet with to discuss any questions or concerns that I may have.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    Adequate access to vital equipment/facilities and administrative assistance are necessary for research training. Depending on what type of research you are interested in will depend on what equipment/facilities you need. For example, if you are interested in using mouse models for your research, you will need access to an animal facility. It is important to understand what services that facility offers, as it is preferential for you as the researcher not to have to worry about changing cages and feeding mice. In addition, library resources and technical support are also needed. A strong administrative support team is also a necessity as they can support you through the vast amount of paperwork that comes with writing manuscripts, applying for grants, and attending national meetings.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    I could not be happier with the way the UW, and specifically the Department of Medicine, has supported me both professionally and personally. As a member of the Department of Medicine, I truly feel like a member of a family that is here to support me in many ways. I have received excellent mentoring and support from many UW faculty in my career development. This has taken place through career guidance, but also through assistance with grant writing and preparing for my independent research career. In addition, when personal issues arose in my life, the Department of Medicine has gone above and beyond all expectations to support me and my family. I feel very blessed to have done my training here and to have the opportunity to continue to work in this Department.

Education:
BS, Psychology, Univ of Iowa
MS, Kinesiology, Univ of Illinois-Chicago
MD, Univ of Illinois College of Medicine
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Medical Oncology Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Current Position: Associate Professor, Hematology/Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I was initially drawn to medical school to gain the clinical perspective needed to translate my bench research into patient benefit. These interests directly led to my decision to pursue a career in academic medicine. As I finished my third year of medical school, I had focused my clinical interests in the field of medical oncology. However, I had not focused my subspecialty or research interests. I set four criteria to rank residency programs: 1) did the Institution have particular research strengths in basic science, clinical research and/or translational research; 2) Would the program structure my training program to provide extended protected time for my research; 3) does the institution have adequate breadth of opportunities should my clinical/research interests change during my clinical training; and 4) does the institution recruit and retain their trainees for faculty positions. I chose the UW as they scored highly in all of these areas. I'm thrilled that the training program lived up to all of my expectations.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    The key factor in my success has been the support and protected research time that the UW provided during my training program. In combination with excellent mentorship, UW helped me to gain independent, extramural funding by the fourth year of my training program as well as a career development award in my sixth and final year of the [physician-scientist] research pathway.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    My current success in academic medicine can be directly traced to my decision to pursue the research pathway for my training program. I could not have accomplished my research goals without the protected time provided by this pathway. It is with this protected time that I could take full advantage of the phenomenal mentorship and research opportunities at UW. Finally, the existing research infrastructure at UW, from bench researchers to the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research to the extensive clinical research infrastructure, enabled me to develop my own research niche that has defined my early success.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    It is important to remember that our training programs don't end when we finish residency. Continuity and support throughout the fellowship and research years are key to a successful transition to a faculty position and success in academic medicine. The "buy-in" from department leadership opens doors throughout the institution for trainees to pursue their own research interests with the goal of developing trainees for their careers in academic medicine.

Education:
BS, Molecular Biology, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison
MD, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

​​​​​​​Current Position: Assistant Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine, William S. Middleton Veterans Hospital in Madison, WI

 

  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I selected UW-Madison because of its perfect fit for my training needs. It had a stellar reputation for both clinical medicine and research. I was not always entirely sure that I wanted a research focused career; UW-Madison gave me the opportunity to learn invaluable clinical skills and provided opportunities for research mentorship and dedicated blocks of research time, allowing me to keep all potential career paths open.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    My research mentor, Jim Stein, helped me create a foundation; My fellow residents, especially early in residency were also amazing resources for possible projects and ideas.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    Consider applying for internal funding if you have a project in mind. There are several opportunities for funding within the UW system for clinical and basic science research. While it may not seem like there is time for this in residency, there is if you make it a priority. The administrative staff at UW is also very supportive in helping match residents with faculty mentors through the SWIFT program and through direct communication with faculty in all departments.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    UW helped me combine a T32 research year in clinical cardiology with a general cardiology fellowship.

Education:
BS, Medical Microbiology & Immunology, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison
MD, Univ of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
Internal Medicine Residency, UW Hospital and Clinics
PhD, Cellular & Molecular Biology, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison
Infectious Disease Fellowship, UW Hospital and Clinics

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Current Position: Assistant Professor, Infectious Disease, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 
  1. Why did you select/consider UW-Madison for your residency program? Were you always focused on a research career?

    I was excited to pursue a research career upon graduation and found UW-Madison to have excellent opportunities for both research and internal medicine training.

  2. Was there anything/anyone in particular at UW that helped create a solid foundation for your research?

    The collaborative atmosphere with the strong basic science campus helped created a solid research foundation.

  3. Any advice for med students considering a research pathway for residency/fellowship? Especially relating to support services we have here at UW?

    Residency and fellowship is a great time to pursue research. I recommend meeting with multiple faculty mentors to find a project that is exciting to you.

  4. How has UW continued to support your research career beyond residency?

    The UW has provided me with mentoring, coursework, and lab space important for pursuing a career as an independent investigator.