University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Timothy Schmidt

ASST PROFESSOR (CHS)

HEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY Faculty

CLINICAL SCIENCE CENTER
600 HIGHLAND AVE
MADISON, WI 53792-0001

Education

  • Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO – MD
  • University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, Chicago, IL – Residency in Internal Medicine
  • Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA – Fellowship in Hematology/Oncology
  • Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA – Chief Fellow

Professional Activities

Dr. Timothy Schmidt is a faculty member of the Division of Hematology, Medical Oncology, and Palliative Care within the Department of Medicine. He is a member of the American Society of Hematology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the International Myeloma Society. Dr. Schmidt also serves as a peer reviewer for clinical hematology journals and is involved in medical education for trainees, medical professionals, and patient outreach organizations.

Clinical Specialties

Dr. Schmidt’s clinical interest is in management of hematological malignancies, including the use of bone marrow transplantation and CAR-T cell therapy. In his clinic, he specializes in caring for patients with multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders including monoclonal gammopathies and amyloidosis.

Research Interests

View Dr. Timothy Schmidt’s publications on NCBI My Bibliography

Dr. Schmidt’s research focuses on improving outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma. He is involved in the development and conduct of early phase and cooperative group clinical trials for patients with plasma cell disorders. Dr. Schmidt is interested in differentiating patterns of disease biology that lead to variable outcomes among patients with multiple myeloma. Through outcomes research and scientific collaborations with laboratory-based researchers, Dr. Schmidt hopes to translate these findings into clinical trials that aim to clarify how treatment may be tailored for individual patients to improve survival and reduce toxicity.