University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Caitlin Pepperell, MD, FRCPC

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

INFECTIOUS DISEASE Faculty

MICROBIAL SCIENCES BUILDING
1550 LINDEN DR
MADISON, WI 53706-1521

(608) 262-5983

EDUCATION

  • Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada – MD
  • University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada – Residency in Internal Medicine
  • University of Toronto – Fellowship in Infectious Disease
  • Stanford University, Stanford, California – Fellowship in Infectious Disease
  • Stanford University – Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, populations genetics and microbiology

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Dr. Caitlin Pepperell is a faculty member in the Division of Infectious Disease within the Department of Medicine and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology and an affiliate appointment in the Department of Population Health Sciences. She is an internationally recognized expert on the evolution of bacterial pathogens and directs an NIH funded research lab. Dr. Pepperell mentors undergraduate, Master’s and graduate students as well as medical trainees at all levels. In addition, she has served as an associate director for the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) since 2013. During her time at the MSTP, she developed an innovative curriculum on data science for MD/PhD students.

CLINCIAL SPECIALTIES

Dr. Pepperell is an infectious diseases specialist and maintains an active practice caring for patients in inpatient and outpatient settings at UW Health and the VA.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

View Dr. Caitlin Pepperell's publications on NCBI MyBibliography 

Dr. Pepperell's research focuses on the ecology and evolution of human pathogens. Infectious diseases differ from other human diseases in that they involve the interplay between distinct species with mostly antagonistic goals. Many of the techniques developed in the field of evolutionary biology are well suited to the study of these dynamic systems and are promising tools in the search for improved methods to control and treat infectious diseases.