University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Vincent Cryns, MD

PROFESSOR

ENDOCRINOLOGY, DIABETES & METABOLISM Faculty

UW MED FNDTN CENTENNIAL BLDG
1685 HIGHLAND AVE
MADISON, WI 53705-2281

(608) 262-4786

Education

  • Harvard Medical School - MD

  • Massachusetts General Hospital School - Internship in Internal Medicine

  • Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, New Hampshire - Residency in Internal Medicine

  • Massachusetts General Hospital School - Clinical Fellowship in Medicine, Endocrine Unit

  • Harvard Medical School - Research Fellow in Medicine



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Professional Activities

Dr. Vincent Cryns is a faculty member and chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism within the Department of Medicine. He is also Director of the Wisconsin Obesity Prevention Initiative, a statewide initiative to make our communities healthier by promoting physical activity and nutrition. Prior to joining UW-Madison, Dr. Cryns was a Professor of Medicine and Cell and Molecular Biology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. Dr. Cryns is a member of the Endocrine Society, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the American Diabetes Association. In addition, he is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and has received Best Doctors in America recognition. Dr. Cryns' research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Defense, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen, and other foundations and agencies. His work has been featured on National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered,” O, the Oprah Magazine, ESPN, and Nature and Nature Reviews Cancer.

Clinical Specialties

Dr. Cryns’ major clinical interests are osteoporosis, general endocrinology, and metabolic disorders.

Research Interests

View Dr. Vincent Cryns’ Publications on NCBI My Bibliography

Dr. Cryns’ research focuses on understanding the connections between metabolism and obesity-related diseases like cancer and diabetes in order to develop better treatments for these diseases.