University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health

Overview

General Internal Medicine IMPACT Program

Subspecialty IMPACT Program

Basic Science Pathway

Clinical Investigator Pathway


General Internal Medicine IMPACT Program

The general internal medicine IMPACT Program (clinical investigator or basic science pathways) consists of 24 months of internal medicine training and 36 months of research training. Residents in this pathway rotate on the same ward, ambulatory care and consultative settings as the categorical residents and participate in the same didactic forums during the 24 months of clinical training. During the 36 months of research training, residents have 80 percent of their time protected for research and participate one day a week in ambulatory care continuity experiences for the remaining 20 percent of their time. The total training time is five years, and residents are eligible to take the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination in August of their PG-5 year.

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Subspecialty IMPACT Program

Residents in the subspecialty IMPACT Program (basic science or clinical investigator pathways) also complete 24 months of internal medicine training and, depending on the fellowship, complete 12 to 24 months of clinical training. Allergy/immunology, critical care, endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism, geriatrics, hematology, infectious disease, nephrology, oncology, pulmonary, rheumatology and women's health require 12 months of clinical training; gastroenterology, hematology/oncology, and pulmonary/critical care medicine require 18 months; and cardiology requires 24 months. Regardless of the length of clinical fellowship, all residents in the IMPACT Program receive 36 months of research training in which 80 to 90 percent of their time is dedicated to research. Residents have one-half day per week in an ambulatory care continuity setting during their research years. Therefore, the IMPACT Program, depending on the length of the clinical fellowship, is six or seven years in duration. Residents qualify to take the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination in August of their PG-4 year and the subspecialty board examination in November of their PG-6 or PG-7 year, depending on the length of the clinical fellowship. The transition point between the residency and the fellowship may occur as early as 24 months into training and is determined by the trainee, program director, research mentor and the fellowship director. Work accomplished during the IMPACT Program is directly transferable to other institutions, allowing an individual to become board certified in internal medicine without loss of time if they decide to transfer for fellowship or other research opportunities.

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Basic Science Pathway

The basic science pathway (available for trainees in either the general medicine or subspecialty IMPACT Programs) is intended for individual who wish to carry out in-depth study in areas such as, but not limited to, cell biology, molecular biology, physiology, microbiology, immunology, biomedical engineering, human genetics, and pharmacology. The program is dedicated to offering the trainee experience with the application of research methods, data management, statistics, experimental design, and grant and manuscript writing. Depending on the resident's prior experience, methods of education include formal course work that can lead to a master's degree or Ph.D. in the field of investigation, experience working in a modern laboratory with a research mentor, and completion of investigative work that applies modern biology research methods to human disease, treatment of disease or the science of medicine. The University of Wisconsin has one of the largest graduate schools in the country and basic science courses in all relevant areas of medicine, biology and pharmacology are readily available on this campus.

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Clinical Investigator Pathway

The curriculum for the clinical investigator pathway (available for trainees in either the general medicine or subspecialty IMPACT Program) includes in-depth study of areas such as, but not limited to, clinical epidemiology and population health, pharmacology, behavioral science, medical economics, medical outcomes, public health and health systems research. The program is designed to impart skills in experimental design, implementation and reporting of clinical studies, use of sampling methods, concepts of sample size, analytical methodology, statistical methodology, grant and manuscript writing, and expertise in working with Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). Methods of education include formal course work leading to a master's degree or Ph.D. in a relevant area, experience working with a research mentor, and completion of investigative work. Courses in epidemiology, clinical trail design, biostatistics, laboratory methods, population health, public health, and advanced methods in epidemiology are readily available on this campus. UW is one of the few campuses in the US that will offer a Ph.D. in the fields of Clinical Research and Population Health.

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